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Portico Quartet - "View from a Satellite" (Video)

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Portico Quartet's latest album, Untitled (AITAOA #2), the companion album to last year's Art in the Age of Automation, just dropped last week and it's spacey, trippy, dopeness that I can't stop playing. In particular, I can't stop playing the song "View from a Satellite", a brilliant shimmering crescendo where Jack Wyllie's saxophone is superb and fritters about the air like an excited bird greeting the morning canopy, but it's all about Duncan Bellamy's drumming here, with the best fills that really kick this song into gear. If that's not all, Bellamy also directed the music video for the tune, which seems ideal for an art museum (which, I suppose, is fitting considering the album as a whole). Indulge yourself and play the video after the jump.

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Portico Quartet - 'Untitled (AITAOA #2)'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Radiohead's 2001 album, Amnesiac, was recorded in the same sessions as their 2000 album, Kid A, which saw the group begin their exploration into a more electronic sound. It's hard not to think about those albums when listening to the Portico Quartet's 2018 album, Untitled (AITAOA #2), which was recorded in the same sessions as last year's release, Art in the Age of Automation, though these albums are a return to form as opposed to a tonal divergence. Once again, this group has combined their electronic and jazz influences into something quite grand. To try to heap additional praise on them is to repeat more of the same of the ethereal brilliance they released in their last album.

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Portico Quartet - 'Art in the Age of Automation'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

It's always been hard to peg down the precise sound of the Portico Quartet. The group with the baddest hang (the steel drum, not the conceptual loitering full of camaraderie) in the game has always had electronica elements melded into jazz sensibilities, and with previous efforts to swing the pendulum away from the jazz genre, it's been even more difficult to know what exactly these guys have been up to. However, they've always been master craftsmen and their return back to an earlier sensibility as the Portico Quartet after their 2015 excursion into a more electronic direction, the staid discipline of their sound remains but the jazz sensibility persists nevertheless in their latest album, Art in the Age of Automation, out now on Gondwana Records.

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Portico Quartet - "Endless" (Video)

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

They're back. The difficult to pin down London band with the baddest hang in the game have seemingly returned to a jazzier inclination once more with their upcoming new album, Art in the Age of Automation. At least if that's what their first single, "Endless", can lead us to believe. Check out the video with its collage of assorted images after the jump.

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Portico Set to Release 'Living Fields' (Stream)

Sebastien Helary
Co-Founder
s.helary@nextbop.com / @helaryous

Sadly the Portico Quartet is no more. The band has dropped a member yet Duncan Bellamy, Milo Fitzpatrick and Jack Wyllie are continuing their musical adventures under the moniker Portico. Like a phoenix reborn from its ashes, Portico is now exploring new and foreign territories with a foray into electronic music. The band is set to release their debut as a trio, entitled Living Fields, under the famed Ninja Tune label March 30th. The album features singers Jono McCleery, Joe Newman (Alt-J) and Jamie Woon which bring depth to the spacey and trippy sounds of Portico. Even though the Portico Quartet was never truly a jazz band, Portico has even further distanced itself from the genre, which is not necessarily a bad thing, just a new direction for the band. Albeit electronic music, Living Fields is seriously good electronic music made by real musicians and talented ones at that. Stream 5 tracks from the 9 track album below the jump and see for yourself.