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BAM?

Marc Rosenfeld Antunes
Staff Writer
mra337 [at] nyu.edu / @mcrantunes

All of you who have been following jazz criticism on the internet lately, you will know about how so many want the term “jazz” to be forgotten, dropped from our vocabulary. Anthony Dean-Harris, our chief editor, has discussed the debate in a recent article, and the idea has been more widely mentioned by a number of musicians and critics. There are, indeed, several problems with the word “jazz” and Nicholas Payton has recently suggested to rename it “Black American Music”; the debate has become divided. So what is wrong with the word “jazz”, and is “Black American Music” an appropriate replacement?

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For Your Consideration: John Zorn

Marc Rosenfeld Antunes
Staff Writer
mra337 [at] nyu.edu / @mcrantunes

The Nextbop staff is compiling their lists for the best albums of 2011. The first round of our voting ends today, but voting has not yet closed. Here we will do the closest Nextbop does to reviewing albums and attempt to persuade the rest of the staff to change their lists.

I’m not going to promote any one album here. But I will say this; it seems as though a large part of the “jazz” community is never really thinking about one of the hallmarks of music in the past couple of decades. John Zorn’s output is prolific in nature, and the quality of any given composition or improvisation is outstanding. A couple of months ago, I wrote an article concerning why Zorn should be remembered in free jazz as the most historic figures like Eric Dolphy are. But John Zorn’s style is one that is always evolving.