arrow
bar_big image

Everything In Its Right Place

John Weatherman
Contributing Writer
the.head.in[at]gmail.com / @TheHeadIn

Wayne Shorter's Without A Net is soon to be released on Blue Note, and the record - which features the saxophonist's longstanding group with Danílo Perez, John Patitucci and Brian Blade - got me thinking about jazz masters.

bar_big image

Marsalis' Mood

John Weatherman
Contributing Writer
the.head.in[at]gmail.com / @TheHeadIn

Wynton Marsalis. The guy who played like Buddy Bolden (on a track from Live At The Village Vanguard). The guy who sounds like Louis Armstrong. The guy who's stuck in the past.

It's a popular conception of Marsalis - a die hard traditionalist who hates the sound of dissonance and can't see past 1964.

It's not a totally wrong conception, but it is one without nuance. Luckily, that nuance is easily found in Marsalis' own music.

An especially nuanced, but often overlooked, record from the trumpeters best years is one which not only shows Marsalis' mastery of his instrument but also is one of the best examples of a tribute record out there - Marsalis Plays Monk.

bar_big image

Don't Be Afraid, The Clown's Afraid Too

John Weatherman
Contributing Writer
the.head.in[at]gmail.com / @TheHeadIn

When was the last time you heard a record that could barely hold it together? A record made by musicians who hated each other, or hadn't showed for the rehearsals, or couldn't quite handle the material?

Recordings have always been viewed as the place to make things perfect. Whether the musician was recording as a way to get people to gigs - Sonny Rollins, for one, felt that recordings were the obligation of the gigging musician - or as a way to do what was impossible live - Bill Evans or Lennie Tristano's overdubbed records - the emphasis has always been on providing the record buyer with the best possible example of the musician's art.