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"And I Love Her": A Critical Analysis of Covers

Ben Gray
Staff Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

Brad Mehldau has a reputation for building beautiful piano trio versions of pop songs, notably including a lot of Beatles material. His trio release from earlier this year, Blues & Ballads, includes a fantastic version of "And I Love Her" with Larry Grenadier and Jeff Ballard. More recently, Gilad Hekselman, Petros Klampanis, and Ziv Ravitz played a trio concert with that they've titled Across the Rooftop featuring their takes on Beatles tunes. They're releasing the videos from that concert one song at a time, starting with "Across the Universe" and most recently releasing their own version of "And I Love Her". So it seems that these two independently conceived of versions of the tune are worth a listen, no?

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Butcher Brown - 'Virginia Noir'

Ben Gray
Staff Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

It's no secret that Butcher Brown gets love around here. The relative quiet around the release of their new album Virginia Noir needs to be remedied, since this might well be the quartet's best release yet. The band has continued to grow with time as well as through its many collaborations (maybe you caught them on Nicholas Payton's Numbers) and side projects (see Corey Fonville playing with Christian Scott, among others, and DJ Harrison's many solo releases, to name a few). On Virginia Noir, they've gravitated toward strong, funky grooves and relatively minimal solos from the band members.

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Nomade Orquestra - self-titled

Ben Gray
Staff Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

Nomade Orquestra is a Sao Paolo-based collective making music that pulls from jazz, funk, and hip-hop to build a cinematic feel. The term 'cinematic' is tossed around for a lot of music, but just go ahead and listen to "Bedum" and don't picture a chase scene in a spy movie. The musician credits aren't listed on the band's bandcamp page, but expect to hear groove-heavy drums and basslines coupled with a solid horn frontline, Wurlitzers, Rhodes pianos, and organs, guitar, and the odd sample or scratching from a DJ. Judging from the photo on the band's website, there seem to be ten people involved here.

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Joe Tatton Trio - 'Bang Bang Boogaloo'

Ben Gray
Staff Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

In 2016, finding music on bandcamp is the new digging in the crates. All the more appropriate, then, to come across Joe Tatton’s new two-track single (available as a 45rpm record and digitally), sounding like something unearthed from 1960. It’s labeled as the Joe Tatton trio, but I checked the math and both tracks feature five musicians. The core trio of Tatton on piano, Neil Innes on bass, and Sam Hobbs on drums are supplemented by Pete Williams and Danny Templeman on percussion for "Bang Bang Boogaloo", and by Chris Dawkins on guitar and Steve Parry on brass for "Sunday Shade". Both tracks very much bring the heat, but as I’m replaying "Sunday Shade" for the third time in a row now, I’d say the B-side wins here. Check out both tracks after the jump.

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Joe Tatton Trio - 'Bang Bang Boogaloo'

Ben Gray
Staff Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

In 2016, finding music on bandcamp is the new digging in the crates. All the more appropriate, then, to come across Joe Tatton’s new two-track single (available as a 45rpm record and digitally), sounding like something unearthed from 1960. It’s labeled as the Joe Tatton trio, but I checked the math and both tracks feature five musicians. The core trio of Tatton on piano, Neil Innes on bass, and Sam Hobbs on drums are supplemented by Pete Williams and Danny Templeman on percussion for "Bang Bang Boogaloo", and by Chris Dawkins on guitar and Steve Parry on brass for "Sunday Shade". Both tracks very much bring the heat, but as I’m replaying "Sunday Shade" for the third time in a row now, I’d say the B-side wins here. Check out both tracks after the jump.