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Diego Barber - 'One Minute Later'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

In the credits of his new album, One Minute Later, out now on Sunnyside, Diego Barber as listed as playing the classical guitar. Based on this album, this seems true in the most cursory, nominal sense. Maybe classic is a state of mind, maybe it's more of a contextual thing. If it is indeed based on context, Barber's playing alongside Ben Williams' bass, Eric Harland's drums, and Alejandro Coello's assorted instrumentation may not lend itself to the name classical.

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Dave Chisholm - 'Instrumental'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Dave Chisholm is multi-talented. He's a deft trumpeter and composer-- expressive, expansive, illustrative with an idea of direction and arch. He is also a graphic artist with a good sense of form and an eve better sense of oddness. For an artist of any sort, these are all good qualities to have and it's an immense asset to be able to express oneself in multiple media, bringing together these passions into a pair of works that fulfill a certain vision. In his graphic novel and the accompanying soundtrack to Instrumental, Dave Chisholm is realizing his talents magnificently.

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Kurt Rosenwinkel - 'Caipi'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Few things can put a smile on your face this year quite like Kurt Rosenwinkel's latest Brazilian-influenced album, Caipi, out now on Sunnyside. The man has been an inspiration to a whole generation of jazz musicians for his ambitious but amiable approach to the guitar. However Rosenwinkel has went beyond this, playing most of the instruments, singing, and arranging himself and a few other guests to create a work that puts this aesthetic to even more awe-inspiring application.

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Maria Grand - 'TetraWind'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Tenor saxophonist/vocalist María Grand is on Steve Coleman's next album (Morphogenesis with Coleman's group, Natal Eclipse, is out June 23rd on Pi Recordings). Based on her four-song EP, TetraWind, based on each of the four directions, it's understandable why. Her style of composition has that same circular feel to it that is propelled by a steady beat. Her sound feels elemental. Clearly, according to song titles, there are themes investigated through music. Looking into her 23 minute album would seem like a good introduction to her on her own terms. It's clear why she fit right in with a distinct voice like this.

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Arthur Hnatek - 'Lualuna Tai - With DKSJ'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

An album like Lualuna Tai, the four song EP composed by drummer Arthur Hnatek (who has backed the likes of Tigran Hamasyan, Erik Truffaz, and Dhafer Youssef) and performed with the DKSJ All Stars, could easily be described as ethereal. It has a sound that emerges from some fuzziness, finding form and structure and maybe a few tumbles of chaos for even measure. It's an album that reminds one of the amazingness of music, that these objects -- skins on tins, warped metal tubes, wooden cases with strings stretched taut across -- when used as tools can bend the air, and that gifted people with like mind can change time. Each of these songs have a simple energy that lavishes in its growth.