arrow
bar_big image

No More Lines in the Sand

[Anthony Dean-Harris]
Editor-In-Chief
anthonydeanharris@gmail.com / @retronius

"We need all the aspects of it [jazz] and that’s okay. We need the Wynton Marsalis and we need the Anthony Braxton and we need a Chris Botti and we need Christian Scott. We need a Ledisi and we need a Rachelle Ferrell. We need everything... We need it all because that word doesn’t belong to anybody anymore. It’s become so broad that to me the only element of that word that has any meaning universally is just improvisation. Jazz can be anything but maybe the only element that’s there across the board is that people are creating it in the moment." Esperanza Spalding, [April 2, 2010]

bar_big image

Esperanza Spalding Interview

[Anthony Dean-Harris]
Editor-In-Chief
anthonydeanharris@gmail.com / @retronius

Last month, Esperanza Spalding performed in San Antonio. A few weeks before her performance, I interviewed her for a concert preview for [African-American Reflections]. Since a half-hour interview supplies much more material than a 600 word piece and I just so happen to hate waste, I figured I'd put the whole interview together and let the Nextbop audience give it a listen.

bar_big image

But How Do You Sell It?

[Anthony Dean-Harris]
Editor-In-Chief
anthonydeanharris@gmail.com / @retronius

As we come off the heels of a couple very pulse pounding weeks, I found myself in a bit of a quandary as it relates to writing. I recently went through a case of writer’s lethargy (akin to writer’s block but instead of lacking ideas on which to write, I lacked the motivation to write at all). After that passed, I lacked the capacity to write as I should since my computer died. (Now accepting donations so I can buy a new computer and so these hits can keep on coming.) But one rather difficult obstacle was figuring out how to write a column in a given week in the midst of artist-specific dedicated weeks on Nextbop.

bar_big image

The Gospel According to Miles

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-In-Chief
anthonydeanharris@gmail.com / @retronius

Originally published in Reflections Magazine, an [African-American Reflections] publication.

I have been blessed to write about what I have called time and again “my first love after Jesus.” I find it to be a rather thrilling task to undertake, but it comes with a certain challenge. In essence, I’m speaking about an art form that many consider dead. There are those who when talk of jazz comes up, thoughts go to Nat King Cole or Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. Few think about the players today like Vijay Iyer or Brad Mehldau, Gretchen Parlato or Esperanza Spalding. Jazz is a form that continually grows, advances, and adapts to the times but what it doesn’t seem to do is let enough people know about those changes.

bar_big image

The Ongoing Tastemaker

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-In-Chief
anthonydeanharris@gmail.com / @retronius

As the music industry continues to go through its bellyaching and permutations, it’s rather difficult to stay optimistic about it all. It’s even more difficult to try to predict the future. In this ever-changing landscape, folks are forming opinions about the industry coming from over hill and dale.